Vermont Biz | December 13, 2016

Medicaid review board votes to lift some restrictions on life-saving cures for Vermonters with hepatitis C
At its meeting on December 6, Vermont Medicaid’s Drug Utilization Review Board (DURB) voted to lift some of the restrictions that currently prevent most Vermont Medicaid patients with hepatitis C from accessing life-saving cures. If the DURB’s recommendation is accepted by Department of Vermont Health Access Commissioner Steven Costantino, many more Vermonters on Medicaid who have the life-threatening disease will gain access to treatment. According to the CDC, hepatitis C kills more Americans than any other infectious disease and Baby Boomers are most at risk.

Vermont Legal Aid’s Office of the Health Care Advocate and a coalition of organizations sent a letter to the DURB in late October asking the Board to review and remove all restrictions on hepatitis C medications that deny patients access to medically necessary care and cause unnecessary harm to Vermonters. ...

Julia Shaw, a policy analyst with the Office of the Health Care Advocate, said, “We were hopeful that the DURB would lift all the restrictions as other states like Massachusetts and Connecticut have done, and as we believe is required by federal Medicaid law. However, this is an important step in the right direction. We are very happy that the DURB lifted the sobriety requirement, which is particularly arbitrary and punitive to people, many of whom are unable to access substance abuse treatment.

Ensuring that more patients can access curative treatments for hepatitis C will benefit those individuals greatly and will help prevent new infections.”

“We’re pleased that the DURB voted to revisit the issue within the next six months to consider expanding access further,” Shaw added. “Federal courts, national medical guidelines, and other state Medicaid agencies have recognized that treatment of every patient with hepatitis C is the standard of care. There is simply no medical reason for Vermont to withhold access to this cure.”

“Commissioner Costantino acknowledged in remarks last week that those who have hepatitis C should have the opportunity to be cured of hepatitis C – and that it’s morally the right thing to do. We’re hopeful that he will not only accept the DURB’s recommendations, but also move as quickly as possible to make treatment available to every Vermonter who needs it,” Shaw said.

This article was the lead story in the Vermont Biz eHealth newsletter, which is distributed every Tuesday. Vermont Business Magazine included additional information from the CDC and other sources about the scope of hepatitis C infection and risks, along with this quote:

“Why are so many Americans dying of this preventable, curable disease?” asked Jonathan Mermin, M.D., director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. “Once hepatitis C testing and treatment are as routine as they are for high cholesterol and colon cancer, we will see people living the long, healthy lives they deserve.”