VPR | December 16, 2016

Change In Vt. Medicaid Policy Could Improve Access To Live-Saving Hepatitis C Treatment

A change in Vermont’s Medicaid policy could soon deliver potentially life-saving treatment to many low-income patients with hepatitis C. But the reform won’t come cheap, and even with the changes, many patients still won’t have access to the costly cure. ...

But last week, the state’s Drug Utilization Review Board voted to change the policy. And the drugs will now be available to people with damage scores of F2 or worse. The policy previously reserved treatment only for patients with scores of F3 and F4, which denotes severe liver damage.

“A score of F2 indicates that the liver ... there already is some damage beginning there, but it is less severe damage than Medicaid had required previously,” says Julia Shaw, a policy analyst with the Office of the Health Care Advocate.

Shaw’s office had also been pushing the board to lift a requirement that patients be drug- and alcohol-free for six months prior to receiving treatment. Shaw says there’s no medical evidence that even injection drug users suffer higher rates of re-infection than people who remain abstinent.

The board agreed.

Steven Costantino, commissioner of the Department of Vermont Health Access, says he’ll take steps to institute the reforms voted on by the board.