Valley News | January 29, 2017

Date: 
January 29, 2017

Two Area Nursing Homes Were Sold: One Got Better, the Other Got Worse

Recent ownership changes at two large nursing homes in the heart of the Upper Valley have had opposite effects on the conditions and quality of care for dozens of residents, according to observations and ratings from regulators and advocates.

Brookside Health and Rehabilitation, a 67-bed facility in White River Junction, has seen its overall rating by Medicare fall from five stars to two stars since August 2015, when it was purchased by a New York-based group of real estate investors and nursing home operators.

Five stars indicate a “much above average” rating, while two stars indicate “below average,” according to the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which awards the stars using data from state inspections and reports from nursing home operators.

“They appear to be on a downward path,” said Eric Avildsen, executive director of Vermont Legal Aid, which operates the state’s Long Term Care Ombudsman program. Problems showed up in Brookside’s last relicensing inspection, he said: “We’re taking it pretty seriously.”

Last year the ombudsman conducted five cases and received 14 complaints against Brookside, which Avildsen termed “a relatively high number.” [...]

While the state ombudsmen don’t currently have an individual client who has an open complaint against Brookside, Avildsen said, they are aware that there have been significant problems and a number of residents have been in touch “informally” about staffing and care quality problems.

Brookside’s fall to its current two-star overall rating resulted from health inspections that left it with only one star in that category. Star ratings are primarily based on the results of health inspections by state officials, but also reflect adjustments for staffing numbers and health care services and outcomes reported by facilities. [...]